What’s wrong with this story.

    Why is Next hiring thousands of cheap Eastern European workers to staff English warehouse – in area where more than 200,000 are on the dole – before they even advertise the jobs here?

    • ‘Busloads’ of Polish workers arrive at Next’s warehouse in West Yorkshire

    • Unemployment higher than average in Humber and Yorkshire with 218,000 out of work

    • Reports that Polish agency has sent 7,000 people to work at Next already

    • Operations director at Polish firm said he received 100 calls a day asking about Next jobs

    • Next says it currently uses about 250 Polish workers and hires up to 500 a year

    • Spokesman claims the firm ‘simply cannot recruit enough people locally

         

        If Next say they can’t get recruits locally then i would be asking why?

        Why are next advertising Abroad surely we should be demanding first pick for are own people.

        Questions need to be asked and quickly.

        God what’s next nurses who can’t speak English!

        Hospitals across the NHS are drastically short of nurses and figures show that as many as 20,000 full-time posts are vacant. Because of this, hospitals are hiring hundreds of nurses from the EU without properly checking their English, a Mail investigation has found. Trusts are holding recruitment fairs in Spain and Portugal and helping nurses with poor English fill in forms using automatic translation websites. The nurses are being lured with the promise of double pay and are also being offered a month’s free accommodation, paid for by the NHS. Midwife Sonia Sousa (left) cannot work out her own wage in English but has been promised a job by the NHS. Critics say the practice could put patients at risk –

        with many of the nurses unable to understand medical instructions in English or even the words for numbers, so they can make up correct drug doses.

        Read it and cheer good bloody riddance

        SALFORD CITY MAYOR IAN STEWART TO STAND DOWN

        Star date: 28th November 2014

        THE FIRST AND THE WORST ELECTED MAYOR OF SALFORD PACKS IT IN

        “We as a Council must be more open and transparent with the public…” Ian Stewart 2012

        Having earned over a quarter of a million pounds during his four year reign, Salford City Mayor, Ian Stewart, is apparently to stand down at the next mayoral election in 2016.

        In typical fashion, the Salford Star understands that Stewart told Labour leaders of other Greater Manchester city councils the news, before he told Salford councillors or the people of Salford.

        Full details here…

        Fresh off the star

        SALFORD CITY COUNCIL FREEDOM OF INFORMATION TRUTH PROBLEMS

        Star date: 27th November 2014

        SALFORD COUNCIL ECONOMICAL WITH TRUTH OVER SPIRIT OF SALFORD COSTS

        Salford Council has been found to have been economical with the truth over a Freedom of Information (FOI) request regarding the Mayor’s flopped Spirit of Salford event this summer.

        When a resident asked under FOI how many Council staff were paid for working on the event the answer was “None”. After an internal review it turns out that they were given time off in lieu: ie they were paid. This is just part of an ongoing battle residents are having with the Council’s FOI attitude, with twenty FOI requests `long overdue’, dating back almost twelve months.

        Full details here…

        Thought of the day what happens when you knock down schools and then build new smaller capacity sites?

        Council bosses in Salford have announced the latest round of school expansions to tackle the city’s primary places crisis.

        With places rapidly running out, extra capacity is needed across Salford. By September 2015, council bosses hope to have created the equivalent of 14 new primary schools, through massive expansion of existing buildings over five years.

        But they’ll have to do the same again between 2016 and 2020 to cope with demand.

        A council report reveals that for 2015/16 there will be a shortfall of 148 places. That figure drops slightly, to 81, the following year, but rises steadily each September until 2020/21.

        In 2017/18, the predicted shortfall is 235, followed by a 216 shortfall the year after. By 2019/20, there will be a shortfall of 232, climbing to 273 by 2020/21.